Capitalists form their own party

Our Values

We are South Africans who want to live in a country that works.

We believe that politics is too important to be left to politicians.

We believe that the best way to grow our country is by ensuring every citizen has freedom to build new wealth.

We have practical ways to fix what’s broken.

We are committed to ten core principles needed to bring this vision to life

1. Liberty

2. Individual rights before group rights

3. Tolerance and absolute protection of freedom of expression

4. Private property rights protected by law

5. Rule of law

6. Right to work

7. The right to be secure on your own property and to defend yourself against intruders

8. Free markets and international free trade based on enlightened self-interest

9. Firearms for self-defence

10. Spontaneous order and Civil society

Our 10 principles

We are South Africans who want to live in a country that works.

We believe that politics is too important to be left to politicians.

We believe that the best way to grow our country is by ensuring every citizen has freedom to build new wealth.

We have practical ways to fix what’s broken.

We are committed to ten core principles needed to bring this vision to life

1. Liberty

  • Liberty is the primary political value of our country
  • We all have lots of different values, we care about our family, our religious institutions such as our churches, temples, mosques, synagogues, but when it comes to what to do politically – what should the government do – we should ask one question: does this increase or does it reduce the freedom of the individual?
  • Government should only act to prevent harm to others.

2. Equality — Individual rights before group rights

  • The individual is more important than the collective.
  • We must not sacrifice the interest of individuals for the ‘common good.’ Every individual matters, every individual is worthy of respect, every individual is equal before the law.
  • Affirmative action undermines meritocracy. Historic discrimination against certain groups does not justify present discrimination against other groups. 

3. Tolerance and absolute protection of freedom of expression

  • Tolerance means one should not interfere with things of which one disapproves.
  • Tolerance begins with freedom of expression which means freedom of thought, speech, religion, and media
  • A society cannot develop unless every citizen has the right to express any opinion even if other citizens find such views to be offensive.
  • Hate speech laws are used by governments to censor discussion.
  • Words can never be equated with physical violence

4. Private property rights protected by law

  • The difference between prosperity and poverty is property.
  • Nations prosper when private property rights are well defined and enforced. (This is why the people of South Korea are almost 17 times wealthier than the people of North Korea and are on average 15 cm taller because of better nutrition.)
  • The State has the right to expropriate property in the public interest, for example to build dams or freeways or railways, but such expropriation should be based on fair market value decided by the courts.
  • “Expropriation Without Compensation” is legalized theft by the State

5. Rule of law

  • The State cannot do whatever it wants to do when it wants to
  • Rule of law requires the State to exercise power in accordance with well-established and clearly written rules, regulations, and legal principles
  • Before the State may impose civil or criminal liability, laws must be written with enough precision and clarity that an ordinary person will know that certain conduct is forbidden
  • All people are equal before the law

6. Right to work

  • Any person has the right to work for another person on terms which they both agree to and the State should not be able to impose minimum wage requirements
  • If a school-leaver or graduate wishes to work for no pay in order to gain experience, it is their right to do so
  • No person should be forced to join a union or forced to pay contributions to a union

7. The right to be secure on your own property and to defend yourself against intruders

  • The old saying, “A man’s home is his castle” (and that means women too) comes from the Castle Doctrine which says that if an intruder enters your property without permission, you are entitled to use force to protect yourself and your family.

8. Free markets and international free trade based on enlightened self-interest

  • Economic exchange is voluntary activity between individuals. The State  should not tell people where to work, how to save, what to build, what to produce.
  • Leaving things to free market, rather than government planning or organization, increases prosperity, reduces poverty, increases jobs, provides goods that people want to buy
  • Our country’s economic interests should not be compromised because of the State’s political prejudices. If the best source for oil is Iran or the best source for technology is Israel, such trade should be given preference.

9. Firearms for self defence

  • Every citizen who is properly trained in the safe use of firearms has the right to acquire guns for self-defence, unless criminally convicted or mentally unstable.
  • Safe use of firearms should be taught to high school learners

10. Fraternity — Spontaneous order and Civil Society

  • People through voluntary interaction create the rules by which people can live by. People do not need a State to do this and the State should only play a role to resolve conflicts
  • Nobody invented our 11 official languages; they arose because of people communicating with each other, and yet certain rules developed through that process.
  • We believe that most social problems can be more effectively dealt with through such voluntary organizations, like the family, like religious institutions, like cultural organizations, like NGOs, because they have knowledge about the individuals hey are dealing with.
  • Government bureaucracies and inflexible rules can’t change depending on people’s individual circumstances. Civil society is much more effective and can do many things better than a welfare state can.

Our People

Who we are

  • Kanthan Pillay
  • Roman Cabanac
  • Neo Kuaho
  • Gideon Joubert
  • Unathi Kwaza
  • Duncan McLeod
  • Sindile Vabaza
  • Louis Nel
  • Katlego Mabusela
  • Dumo Denga

Why we are doing this

Our future is too important to be left to those seeking power.

Why we can make a difference

We are positive disruptors; combining expertise in business, technology, law, media, education, medicine, finance, sport. Through our personal networks, we are also able to tap into the intellectual capital of the best thinkers in those and other fields.

Our 10 Plans

1. Cash in Transit Heists

Most people think the way to fix these is better policing and more secure vehicles.  

We believe fixing Cash In Transit Heists is as simple as amending a law that makes it difficult for us to be a cash free society.

When elected, we will push for this to be made law.

2. Beneficiation of Mineral Wealth

Why do we ship our gold and diamonds to India and China instead of turning it into jewellery ourselves.

The answer, and the way to fix it, is as simple as amending a law from the colonial era.

When elected, we will push for this change to be made law. 

3. Fixing our schools

We have the most expensive education system in the world but very poor levels of education. How do we start to fix this without simply throwing money at the problem?

We have a simple solution that is inexpensive and also has many positive social consequences.

When elected, we will push for these changes to be made law.
 

4. Increasing tourism

We want to enjoy the benefit of wealthy tourists who can boost our economy.

But our visa requirements for people from the rest of Africa as well as places like China and India are so stringent that many people just take their money to other places, like Kenya and Tanzania.

Our fix is simple and costs nothing. 

When elected, we will push for this to be made law.

5. Improving Policing

We all know policing in our country is a mess. This simple idea will immediately raise the quality of our policing, and it costs nothing. 

When elected, we will push for this to be made law.

6. School Toilets

Children are dying in pit latrines at public schools all over our country. We have no excuse for not fixing this.

Government wants R10 billion to fix it over ten years. We know how to fix this for less than 1/10th of the cost, plus we can do this in six months or less. 

When elected, we will push for this to be made law.

7. Violence against women

Every year, our government runs a campaign called “16 Days of Activism for No Violence Against Women and Children”. Millions are spent, but the number of women and girls assaulted, raped, murdered grows larger every year.

We believe the solution is to equip women from the time they are at school to learn how to better defend themselves.

When elected, we will push for these changes to be made law.

8. Matric Dropouts

Every year, more than half a million learners drop out before they write matric.

Government is clueless about why this happens but we know why this happens; and we know how to fix this.

It will take many years, but we need to start now.

When elected, we will push for these changes to be made law.

9. Solving the drug problem

Illegal drugs are destroying our families and breaking down our communities.

Where drugs become a problem, violent crimes such as robbery and killings increase.

We have a plan to fix this which has been proven to work.

When elected, we will push to make this law.

10. Negative income tax

What are we going to do to fix the economy? We have one core proposal. A Negative Income Tax (NIT) is a fair way of creating a single tax system that pays for government, but also fulfils the social goal of a minimum level of income for all.

Negative Income Tax increases availability of low-cost labour which allows businesses to do locally some of the work which they would otherwise have to outsource to other countries. As an example, this would make our textile industry competitive with Chinese imports. It will also help us when job losses increase when the 4th Industrial Revolution hits us.

Your 10 reasons to vote for us

1. We’re not politicians

None of us have worked in politics before; we all have successful careers in the real world. Most of us will be taking a pay cut to become MPs, yet we want to make a real, positive difference to the country we call our home.

2. We have practical solutions to South Africa’s problems

We’ve costed our ideas and carefully considered how to make them work within South Africa’s constraints. You can watch videos on our ideas here.

3. Small parties can make a big impact

Our plan tells how we can make the maximum possible impact once we are elected. Don’t believe the bigger parties who tell you that you’ll split the vote. (If you’re worried about putting all your political eggs in one basket, you can use your provincial vote for another party.) We plan to punch above our weight.

4. Innovation is central to our approach

South Africa needs new ideas to get out of its low growth, high unemployment rut. We can learn from the examples of others. If there is a case of a policy working well in another country, we should take a serious look at piloting it here too. Portugal has good policy on drugs, New Zealand has its approach to sex work, China has lessons in economic growth and lifting millions out of poverty. We can learn from them all.

5. We don’t just say we’re different — we are different

We don’t market our ideas like a typical political party because we’re not a typical political party. You can read here about why we chose a purple cow as our symbol.

6. We are focused

We are only contesting the National Assembly because that’s where we want to make an impact. We know you’re busy, and we will never ask you to read screeds or sit through hours of speeches.

7. No political baggage

We don’t want to live in the past — we want to build a future. We are interested in tackling the challenges we face today, as a country. That way, we’ll be able to find solutions that will propel SA to greater heights and make us more globally competitive.

8. We are ambitious

We are not here to warm seats in Parliament or perform for the cameras. There are enough people doing that. We are here to make a difference. Call us crazy.

9. We’re interested in how to make things work, not in what’s wrong with everyone else

We will never tell you why not to vote for another party – you can work that one out for yourself.

10. We are optimists

If we weren’t, we wouldn’t be here. We believe that things can be fixed, and that a small party with good ideas can make a real impact – and that there are more South African voters who feel the same way than we might think.

If you like our ideas, please share them with friends, family and colleagues. 

Your 10 reasons to vote for us

1. We’re not politicians

None of us have worked in politics before; we all have successful careers in the real world. Most of us will be taking a pay cut to become MPs, yet we want to make a real, positive difference to the country we call our home.

2. We have practical solutions to South Africa’s problems

We’ve costed our ideas and carefully considered how to make them work within South Africa’s constraints. You can watch videos on our ideas here.

3. Small parties can make a big impact

Our plan tells how we can make the maximum possible impact once we are elected. Don’t believe the bigger parties who tell you that you’ll split the vote. (If you’re worried about putting all your political eggs in one basket, you can use your provincial vote for another party.) We plan to punch above our weight.

4. Innovation is central to our approach

South Africa needs new ideas to get out of its low growth, high unemployment rut. We can learn from the examples of others. If there is a case of a policy working well in another country, we should take a serious look at piloting it here too. Portugal has good policy on drugs, New Zealand has its approach to sex work, China has lessons in economic growth and lifting millions out of poverty. We can learn from them all.

5. We don’t just say we’re different — we are different

We don’t market our ideas like a typical political party because we’re not a typical political party. You can read here about why we chose a purple cow as our symbol.

6. We are focused

We are only contesting the National Assembly because that’s where we want to make an impact. We know you’re busy, and we will never ask you to read screeds or sit through hours of speeches.

7. No political baggage

We don’t want to live in the past — we want to build a future. We are interested in tackling the challenges we face today, as a country. That way, we’ll be able to find solutions that will propel SA to greater heights and make us more globally competitive.

8. We are ambitious

We are not here to warm seats in Parliament or perform for the cameras. There are enough people doing that. We are here to make a difference. Call us crazy.

9. We’re interested in how to make things work, not in what’s wrong with everyone else

We will never tell you why not to vote for another party – you can work that one out for yourself.

10. We are optimists

If we weren’t, we wouldn’t be here. We believe that things can be fixed, and that a small party with good ideas can make a real impact – and that there are more South African voters who feel the same way than we might think.

If you like our ideas, please share them with friends, family and colleagues. 

Your questions, our answers

Why a new party?

Short answer: we have a great country, we have great people; but our politicians are clueless.

Innovation and disruption are driving growth around the world, but our politicians cannot fix traffic lights, potholes, and school toilets. How can we then expect them to understand a digital world where new technologies will change and improve all our lives?

We believe that in order to go forward quickly and safely, we need to look through the windshield instead of the rear view mirror.

Why the name?

South Africa is a capitalist country. The street vendor is a capitalist. The spaza shop owner is a capitalist. The minibus taxi driver owner is a capitalist. The factory owner is a capitalist. The farm owner is a capitalist. The mining boss is a capitalist. And all of those capitalists come together to create jobs and prosperity for all of us.

Politicians have turned capitalism into a swear word because it allows them to steal money from hardworking families and use the money for corruption. We are turning that around. We are saying that if you are a taxpayer or if you employ someone and pay them or if you provide a service which people pay for, you are a capitalist and you should be proud of what you do to grow our country.

We want all citizens to improve the quality of their lives. No country has done so without capitalism. 

Why the logo?

Cattle are Africa’s most potent symbol of personal wealth. Our logo also represents a bull market.

What makes you different?

None of us are professional politicians. Each of us is a South African with a track record of competence and success in the private sector.

Why should I vote for you?

We intend to shake things up in parliament. We will question every decision where parliament wants to spend your money and we will tell parliament how to solve the same problem more efficiently and less expensively.

Other new parties have failed. What makes this one different?

We believe that future governments in our country will be coalitions (as is already the case in most modern first world democracies). A small party focussed on specific achievable goals can make a tangible difference.

Who is funding you?

We are self-funded. It costs R500 to register a political party and R200 000 to contest the national elections (which we will recover when we win our seats in parliament). We fully support transparency of funding and will declare the names of major donors (any amount greater than R50 000) on our website.

How many MPs do you hope to get into Parliament?

We hope to get at least ten MPs into the national assembly. This will need about 45 000 votes per candidate or about half-million votes in total. We believe this is realistic.

Who is on your list of candidates?

See the full list here.

Who is your leader? Who is your spokesperson?

Titles are not our style. Political parties have imploded because candidates fight over titles. Our candidates are all committed to our principles, our policies, our plans.

Will you be fielding candidates for provincial government as well as national government?

We are only fielding candidates for the national assembly. It is not our intention to govern. We believe 10 dedicated MPs working the portfolio committees can play a critical role in influencing legislation.

Aren’t you just a splinter faction of the DA?

We have no affiliation with any political party and hope to take votes away from all of them. We will support any party on votes where that would be in line with our values and policies and oppose them when that is not the case. As an example, we would have supported both the ANC and the DA on the recent vote calling for full disclosure of political funding.

What are your policies?

Take a look here.

Ok, I like you. How can I get involved?

  • Distribute our videos
  • Follow us on Twitter for announcements
  • Join our WhatsApp group on 0614221141
  • Attend our live meetings via Google Hangouts, Facebook Live, YouTube
  • Subscribe to our mailing list
  • Tell your friends about us
  • Register to vote
  • Get to the polls on election day

https://capitalist.org.za/

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